All Things Considered Franchising Podcast with Jamie Lavigne of Woofies

November 16, 2022 00:32:07
All Things Considered Franchising Podcast with Jamie Lavigne of Woofies
All Things Considered Franchising Podcast
All Things Considered Franchising Podcast with Jamie Lavigne of Woofies

Nov 16 2022 | 00:32:07

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Show Notes

This week I had the pleasure of talking with Jamie Lavigne, Franchise Development Manager of Woofies, a great franchise concept in the pet industry. Jamie has vast experience in the franchise industry, working with multiple verticals throughout her career.
 
Jamie discusses how the first time she talked with a potential franchisee, they don't discuss much about Woofies. She wants to know their "WHY," their goals, and what they want to accomplish.
Passion is very important if you're going to be a business owner.
 
With Woofies, you need a passion for animals and need passion to be successful and independent.
 
The pet industry is recession-resistant. With Woofies, there are multiple revenue streams in one package: dog walking, pet sitting, mobile grooming, pet transport, and community events!
This franchise is very scalable. Mobile grooming can be expanded with additional staff and vans. Pet transport is a much-needed service as elderly people may not be able to drive their pets to the vet.
 
Jamie feels the franchise industry as a whole is very strong. Having franchisors to help franchisees during all economic times helps to keep businesses open and thriving.
 
For more information about Woofies, contact
Jamie Lavigne- Woofies
[email protected]
 
Scotty Milas - Scott Milas Franchise Consulting 
[email protected]
 
#woofies #petfranchise #petsitting #mobilegrooming #franchiseoptions #allthingsconsideredfranchising #businessownership #scalablebusiness #diversifyportfolio
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Episode Transcript

Speaker 1 00:00:05 Hey everybody, Scotty Myas, Scott Myas franchise coach.com, another episode of What's Your Know, know Your Why, and All Things Considered Franchising. Well, I all hope you having a great day. Uh, I don't know what time it is or when you're listening to this, but I have one of a, one of my favorite people in the franchise industry, someone who, uh, well, I have to be transparent. Probably one of the first people I met when I started out in this industry. And I won't get into a long, how long it's been, but a long time ago. And one of the people that I think, um, that just has one, a great personality, fits well into the industry, uh, cares about franchising, but just connects well with prospects, her candidates, the brands that she works with, uh, somebody who has just been well respected within the industry. Just I think everybody in the industry knows Jamie Levine. So, welcome, Jamie. Hello. How you doing today? Speaker 2 00:01:01 Hello. Thank you so much. Those are such kind words, like I don't blush easily, but like you may have me blushing, so, man, we go way back. Right. It's been a long time, and I won't say how long it's been. Yeah. Unless I say I started when I was 15, so I Speaker 1 00:01:18 Mean, I'm like you and me. Yeah. Yeah. <laugh>, it's funny when, uh, when people ask me how long you've been doing this, I, I, I don't get into years anymore. I just say, it just seems like a lifetime. But, uh, <laugh>. Speaker 2 00:01:31 But, uh, Speaker 1 00:01:31 Exactly. You know, one of the reasons I wanted to have you on this show is because not only because of your talent and experience and franchising, and I think it's gonna be a great value, uh, you know, as people listen to this hearing, you talk about the industry and of course, uh, Woo's the brand that you're representing now, which is off to an awesome start. Just thank you, really has taken all <laugh>, has really taken all of the, uh, attributes of a, uh, pet con, uh, pet concept and just kind of put it into one, uh, one, one great company. So we'll get into that in a second. But what I wanted to tap in with you first initially is, um, people who are interested in franchising or, uh, diversifying a portfolio, they may own an independent business and looking to diversify. Now they want to go to a franchising for a number of reasons, or people who already own a franchise that are looking to diversify. Speaker 1 00:02:22 And of course, more importantly, those first timers, the people that are, you know, whether look they've been displaced, they're exiting corporate America, uh, they're just fed up, whatever it may be. So when we talk about somebody in that, in those categories that, you know, wants to get into a franchise, and you talk to a lot of people, I mean, you've been in development for a long time and, you know, look, I I, I think within the first half hour of talking to somebody, I think you could pretty much determine whether it's gonna work or not gonna work. And again, absolutely. So what are some of the things that you are hearing, uh, with your prospects, candidates about franchising, you're seeing that the strong attributes are that make will make someone successful in a, in a franchise business? Just let's talk about that for a few minutes before we get into Woo's. Speaker 2 00:03:10 Yeah, absolutely. It's a great topic, and I was actually just having this exact conversation with a candidate last night, actually. You know, um, when I first meet a candidate for the first time, there's several things that I'm looking for, and I'm not interested in talking about the brand at all on the first call. It's really just getting to know that person, what their experiences are from a professional perspective, what's their why, um, why timing, why this industry, not specifically the brand or anything, what's their goals? What are they trying to accomplish? And how they answer those questions or tell me about themselves really. Like, I'm like, yep, they got it, or they don't got it, and I know where, how far we're gonna go in this process. Um, so I'm looking for passion. Of course, they need to have a, a true passion of wanting to be in business for themselves and wanting to be in that particular industry. Speaker 2 00:04:11 Um, so of course with Woos, we're looking for passionate people of, for animals, right. But when I was with Home Watch caregivers, it needed to be a passion for community and people. Right? Um, so I, I truly believe you need to have some passion to be successful unless you are this like Uber entrepreneur that really has a complete system in place from an operational perspective. And, and that does actually definitely work. I've seen it work when I worked for Mining Key and awarded people with, you know, that had multiple Dunking Donuts and stuff like that. So I do think that works, but overall, when people are new to franchising, new to business ownership, they need that passion. I look for are they entrepreneurial or too entrepreneurial, right? Right. Speaker 1 00:04:56 Absolutely. Yep. You Speaker 2 00:04:58 Know, there's people that, you know, they've started their own companies and they're like, they're gonna want too much control. And franchising is a balance of that, right? Franchising is about providing resources to these potential franchisees to help them succeed. And it's a all ships rise, right? You know, the franchisors just as invested in that franchisee as the franchisee is in their business, but sometimes if you're too entrepreneurial, they think they know it all and they can do it better. Yes, absolutely. And, and I've seen that so many times where I'm like, and I straight up, I've just, you know me, Scott, I don't sugarcoat anything. And Speaker 1 00:05:40 That's right. You're a straight shooter. You're, you're, Speaker 2 00:05:42 I just say, I'm like, Hey, you know, I'm enjoying this conversation, but I think you might be too entrepreneurial. And it's almost like that whole taking that candy away from a baby, and then they're like, they're like, no, no, no, no, that's not true. And I was like, okay, well, how would you feel, feel if, if the franchisor says you have to do this, but you don't wanna do it that way? Oh, I wouldn't like that. Well, there you go. And, you know, I give some examples, right? And we try to absolutely, you know, flush that situation out. But, um, I also look for those skill sets that I think will work in the model of the brand that I'm working in, right? With, with Wooy is, it's a logistics company more than anything. So do they have that kind of engineering operational mind that will help with that logistics side? Um, do they like people and dogs and community and, and so it's just like check marks and boxes. And if they don't have those skill sets, do I feel like they have the ability to manage somebody who has those skill sets? Right? So I I'm in my head just kind of checking some boxes and, Speaker 1 00:06:42 And stuff, right? No, that, that, those are great answers, you know, um, and it's funny you brought up the conversation you had last night. I was talking to somebody earlier this week, and we, we got into the word passion. And it's funny because typically I'm the one asking the questions and you know, occasionally they'll ask questions. And this particular client asked me, well, what do you mean by passion <laugh>? You know, what's your definition of having passion for the industry or being an entrepreneur? And I said, well, look, I said, um, I look at it this way. You're currently employed and you're looking to exit. So do you like one and the example you used, do you like when somebody, your superior or a direct report tells you what you should do or how you should do it versus coming up with your own way and or following a system based on what the book is? I said, passion isn't about jumping outta bed every day and feeling excited about going to work because you're not gonna have those days all the time. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. So, you know, when you talk about passion is, is it the passion to be more, to be successful and independent and kind of build it with a foundation? Or you're not talking about the passion of being, like I just said, jumping outta bed and saying, woo whoopies, I'm going to whoops today. I mean, we're not talking Speaker 2 00:08:02 For dog like Speaker 1 00:08:03 My face <laugh>, right? We're not talking about that. Right. We're just talking about that passion to be successful and to follow a proven system. Correct. Speaker 2 00:08:11 Yeah, I completely agree with that. You know, you've got to think, I, I often encourage my candidates, especially when they get cold feet, cuz we all know that happens. I ask 'em if they want me to buy 'em some heated socks. Um, but, you know, I, I encourage them to write a mission statement, you know, so I want you to write down your why. Why did you start wanting to consider your own business to begin with? Write that why down now, write a mission statement of when you do start your own business, and it's not related to specifically any brand, just what's your mission statement for your business? You know, is it about serving people? Is it mission driven? Is it to be able to create your own nice work life balance and, you know, go summer on an island somewhere, you know, whatever, what is your why? What is your mission statement? And then when you're looking at each brand, write down all the skill sets that that brand requires, and check off how many you can do. And then the ones that aren't checked say, can you hire somebody and manage that person? Um, but that's the passion is, you know, what, what do you wanna do for the rest of your life when you grow up? You know? And, um, yeah. So I I'm totally aligned with you. It's more about passion for investing in yourself as opposed to somebody else. Speaker 1 00:09:29 Yep, yep. I mean, I talk a lot with my clients about what's your end game? You know, where are you looking to get to? And people say, well, what do you mean? I go, well, look, you know, you open a business, what are you striving for? What, what's your end game? I mean, there's gotta be an end game. I mean, you know, uh, in sports, the end game is we wanna win the game. We, we come up with a plan to win the game. You're not planning to win the Super Bowl, you're taking it one game at a time. Uh, eventually you start planning to win the Super Bowl. But, so a lot of people get, they get a little bit surprised about that. So Speaker 2 00:10:00 Tell me, exit strategy and exit strategy and succession planning is something they need to think about right away. Yes. That's part of my process. Yeah. But do people, do they freak out? Like, I haven't even bought a business yet. Why are you asking me about talking about that? Well, cause that's important, <laugh>, Speaker 1 00:10:14 Right? Right. Um, tying in your experience in the brands that you've worked with starting out in the industry, I know you were involved in a lot of reviewing, uh, uh, franchise systems, uh, uh, lead generation, sort of things like that mm-hmm. <affirmative>, but, um, and you've been very successful in what you've done and you, you were very successful in your prior brand, uh, kind of helping them get on the map, building it, taking it to the next level. And now you're faced with what I would call that next, you know, chapter where you're doing the same thing. You're, you're, you're taking a, a brand that has been successful at a smaller level and now looking it to take it to that, you know, next level. I guess that's the best way. Tell me about Woo's. Tell me what's exciting about it, what you're seeing it. I mean, look, I always tell my clients the pet industry is a remarkable industry to be in because it's recession resistant, it's technology resistant in most cases, uh, you know, you could go through the stats, but, you know, but there has to be, as you and I just talked about, that passion to be in the industry, it is a business. Speaker 1 00:11:23 But you know, like anything else, if you don't like mowing lawns or taking care of the garden, you probably shouldn't get into a a, an outdoor landscaping company as a franchise. So tell me about Wolf's, what you're seeing, uh, how the brand is doing in in in, in your early development with the company. I'm, I'm, I'm excited to hear about this. Speaker 2 00:11:41 Yeah, well thank you so much. Yeah. I was with Home Watch Caregivers for over five years, and I had a passion for that. Bri talk about passion. Like I also feel like I have to have a passion for the brand I work for, right? And so with Home Watch Caregivers, my first job when I was a kid was at a nursing home and I was somebody's caregiver. Um, so taking that, working with that brand was, was so amazing. Um, and it's still my baby. It was, it was bittersweet to leave. But when Authority Brands brought on Roofies, I was like, please let me be on this brand because I have a lot of dogs, Scott, and you're probably gonna hear them bark at some point, you know, currently three. But at one point I had five, um, and it's only a matter of time before I get to six, like, it's gonna happen <laugh>. Speaker 2 00:12:25 Um, so, so with Woo's, it was so much, I really wanted to be on the brand because I love the industry. I am a huge animal lover. And I, I think it's important to have passion for animals because at the end of the day, dogs are gonna be all over you all the time. You're gonna be surrounded by dogs. And if you don't like pet hair, if you don't like them jumping on you and kissing your face, this is probably not gonna work for you, <laugh>. And so that's where that passion piece comes in, right? They don't necessarily have to have dogs or anything like that, but they need to, they need to be understanding that they're gonna be around dogs and cats and other animals all the time. Um, so with Wolfies, what's also really exciting about it, well, for me it was awesome and exciting to like, take this challenge of taking this little small baby puppy puppy and, and help it train it and grow it to, you know, a an adult male or adult, you know, female dog. Speaker 2 00:13:16 And, uh, I love that challenge and I hadn't done it before. And uh, so I was really excited to get in there. And I'm ADHD as you know, so like, this is Burbank for me. Um, I immediately bonded with the brand leaders. Like I was, I met them for the first time and I was like, where have you people been my whole life? Like, I felt like I was instantly connected, like we've been long lost Soul Sisters. So that was great for me, for my culture and what I was looking for. But this is a brand that takes multiple, you know, revenue streams that the other industry, um, competitors are doing just one and puts 'em into one package, right? So instead of having to buy multiple different brands to do these revenue streams, you can get one. Um, so it's six revenue streams, dog walking, pet sitting, and I like to explain pet sitting cuz people just think that's boarding, which it's not. Speaker 2 00:14:09 Pet sitting is where the pet sitter either goes into the client's home or the pets go to the passenger's home, which we call bed and biscuit. There's the dog club <laugh>, and I have no idea what they're baring at. Probably a wild Turkey. Nice gosh. Um, <laugh>, we have, I live in the woods, Scott, on 31 acres I know in northern New Hampshire, hence the, the wooly cap here. Um, so pet sittings in the client's home or at the dog's, uh, pet sitter's home and it's all animals, dogs, cats, beard to dragons, birds, goats, chickens, <laugh>, you know, people need their chickens. Dragon, they love it. Oh yeah. That is like a super popular pet right now. Um, then of course there's, there's the mobile grooming, um, and mobile grooming hence, you know, versus retail is, is just so much better because in a retail environment you can only put so many, you know, uh, dog grooming stations and so you're gonna cap out. Speaker 2 00:15:04 But with mobile grooming is so incredibly scalable. Same with the dog walking ping, but you want more grooming, uh, revenue. Put another van in, you want another one, put another van. And you just keep growing it. And, and people prefer this cuz they don't, they'll, they'll trade time for money, right? They don't have to bring their dog to the retail location. They don't have to stress their dog out that stays in a kennel and stuff like that. And then have to go back and pick them back up. They don't even have to be home. You just have a lockbox and the, you know, the groomer can go in, grab the dog, and the dog creates a relationship with the same groomer over and over again ing. So it's a whole different experience. Plus you get to charge way more. I mean, come on. Um, then we also do pet transport. Speaker 2 00:15:45 So think of elderly people that need help bringing the animals to the vet. Um, we do community events. We're very much a community infused business. Um, so these are events to either make money or raise money, right? Um, so my favorite one is called Ypi Hour, where you partner with like, yeah, Yi hour. Think of partnering with the dog friendly bar, right? Or brewery or something. And people bring their dogs down and you, you have, uh, you, you do brush outs, you know, de shedding, nail trim, ear cleaning, teeth cleaning. They go in and have to have some margaritas. They come out and they're a little tipsy and they're like, oh. And we're like, oh, your dog picked out a toy, you should buy it. You know? And so you sell some retail product like, uh, like whoopi's hats and, and uh, dog toys and leashes and stuff like that. Speaker 2 00:16:34 So those are the six revenue streams. Another community event that I really love is, you know, to raise money and give back, right? So pause and claws, pause and claws. This is, you hire a pet photographer that sets up a beautiful backdrop with Santa Claus and people come and get their picture, their dog's picture taken with Santa means. Wow, that's, dogs are dogs and cats are just like Anna, just like children. Wow. These people want pictures with Santa Claus and their dog and they pay for that, you know, 50 plus dollars. And you can either keep that money, but we encourage you to donate it and, and give it back to the community, you know, with a rescue or a shelter. And there's lots of other ways to, to do that as well. Um, since Authority Brands purchase Woos, they are highly invested. The first time Authority brands has invested into a micro emerging brand. So they are very, very, uh, invested in this brand. Interesting seeding. Speaker 1 00:17:29 Yeah, no, they have some great brands. What is it that you're seeing when you're talking to people, uh, you know, potential, uh, franchisees as you start these conversations, are there anything, uh, commonalities between the people that you're talking, forgetting about the love of pets? I mean, obviously we talked about that, that passion, but is there a background you're seeing people coming outta corporate America? Is it the person that, uh, you know, had previously been working in retail and uh, you know, now is thinking or been in the industry, the pet industry before? Are there any commonalities about people that become very interested and then become franchisees? And then to the other side of that is, is there anything that you're seeing that doesn't work? You know, we talked about not having the passion, but excluding that not having a certain qualification or ca coming out of a certain category where it just won't work. Speaker 2 00:18:23 Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. Yeah, I, so we started awarding franchises with authority brands once we got our new F D D in April, basically. And so what I've seen in the last six months is two major distinctions, well maybe a little more than two, but two ones that are extremely prominent. Um, one is family friendly. And so these are, you know, kind of in two branches. One that is they want to bring their adult children into the business, right? And run it as a family business cuz they see this appealing to a mass the masses of their family with their adult children. Um, especially, you know, adult children right now are, are they, um, millennials or what are they? I mean, you know, not no, they're the next one generation down. They really, that generation really has like this real passion piece to it. And so it really works well. Speaker 2 00:19:16 The other one is, um, families that have young children but still wanna start their own business, but they really need that work life balance. So, um, one of our new franchisees, Anna Hall, she has two young children and she needed to be able to work from home every day to still have take care of her children, right? And so this works perfectly for that. And two of our new franchisees are doing this family thing that I was just referencing. The other major bucket is engineers and IT, and operation IT people, engineers and IT, and some operational people. And I love it because that's, this business is a logistics business at the end of the day, right? There's two Speaker 1 00:19:52 Pieces to plotting the schedule out Speaker 2 00:19:54 Exactly the efficiency of your vans and using our technology for that is gonna determine how much money per van revenue wise you make. And so I love those engineer minds. They get it right. And when they see the technology they're like, wow, this is amazing. Um, so those are the two major buckets that I'm seeing. Um, but I, I believe that, you know, any of those corporate America people, we do allow people to be semi absentee so they can manage their manager. Um, so we do allow that. Um, but what I don't want to see is somebody that's doesn't have enough money, you know, I've absolutely have Speaker 1 00:20:30 Run That's a big one. Yeah. Few Speaker 2 00:20:32 Times they are so hungry and they want it so bad and I can feel it coming through the screen when I'm talking to them, but they don't have enough money. And that is something I learned about a long time ago is exactly don't make exceptions on money because they unfortunately will likely fail. The odds are incredibly high because even though they probably have enough money when they start running out, they freak out and then they do stupid things like stop marketing or stop this and try to try to save money and that's the, to the detriment. So that is what it's gonna be really important people to truly understand, especially if they decide to be semi absentee cuz they're afraid to lead their job and stuff. Like, how much money do you really need? You know? And item seven is just a starting point, right? Right. I, I truly believe in saying, Hey, this is just a starting point times that three months working capital by four, do it for a year. If you're gonna be semi absentee, add an extra, you know, 60 to a hundred thousand dollars on top of that. And they were like, what? And I'm like, you gotta Speaker 1 00:21:39 Think about it. Yeah. Plan, plan big and if you have anything left over and you don't use it, just put it back in your pocket or into the business. No, you're absolutely right. Exactly. I think under being underfunded is, is, you know, that's a great point. I mean, uh, you know, being underfunded will catch up to you pretty quickly. It, it goes by those first 90 days, 120 days, just as the process takes 90 to 120 days, 60 to 90, somewhere in there, let's just say 60 to 120. And that goes by pretty quick when you have to make that decision, when the brand makes its decision and they, of course, the person interested in the franchise has to make a decision. But when you're open the first 90 days, those that, that goes pretty quick and uh, it does. Speaker 2 00:22:19 You're on and we wanna be responsible. Yep. You know, that's one of the reasons I love working for Authority Brands, is they believe in responsible growth. And so we're not going to sell 10 territories to a person. You know, we're only going up to three territories. And even then it's like, we're gonna be really stinging about that. It has to be the right fit that you've gotta be financially. Um, and I would rather turn somebody down, which sounds weird to say to a micro emerging brand. Like emerging brands are supposed to take everybody, right? Nah, I wanna sleep at night and so I will turn somebody down because it's not the right fit. And uh, and so, and that doesn't always win me, um, you know, the, the, the vote of the, you know, favorite person award, but that's okay. I'd rather, um, be very honest and upfront. Speaker 1 00:23:07 Let's change the su subject real quick cuz we're running out of, uh, we're running outta some time here and, um, I I, I appreciate the information on Woo's and I'll, I'll give the opportunity for you to men, you know, give out your contact information, how people can get ahold of you, uh, directly if they want instead of calling me to get in touch with you so we can work that out. But, you know, the, the franchising industry franchising has been around for a long time. I mean, you know, it all started back, you know, with Tom Carve and, and everything else mm-hmm. <affirmative> and, and there there are sewing machine <laugh>. Yeah, exactly. Um, you know, and there are license agreements, you know, I mean, look, you know, if I had a, if I had, I had a dollar for everyone who called me up and said, can you get me a Starbucks or a a, you know, a Chipotles, I'd probably be, you know, sitting on the beach right now, um, <laugh> and those aren't franchises and Chick-fil-A is in a franchise, it's a license agreement. Speaker 1 00:23:57 You know, you're, you're, you're paying. And again, everybody has to fit to where they wanna belong, uh, and, and be comfortable. But the franchising industry has had some stereotypes over the years. It's weaved its way in and out of certain, um, economic times. Uh, but it has remained strong. Um, you know, where do you see the industry today? And do you think it's going, and I believe it will remain strong. I think it's gonna be re remain a player and become a bigger player, uh, especially as, as things change and evolve. But do you see the industry being still strong and, and that it's definitely something that people should consider? Speaker 2 00:24:37 I do. I mean, I think Covid proved that actually. Right? Right. Covid proved that, um, you know, during Covid there's a, there's a, a stat out there and i I, and I'm gonna say it, but it's probably a little outdated, but I doubt it's very different that after five years in business that only 20% of independents are still in business, but 90% of franchisees are still in business. Holy cow. That's huge. But now you look at c and the independence were on an island by themselves, right? They had no resources, nobody to help them and, and, and help them with p p and with other resources and, and support. But franchises did, you know, home Watch caregivers was this giant, you know, they all got on the yacht together and supported each other and they stayed aflo, right? And even with some of our other brands and authority brands that did have to have some temporary closures, they all band it together, authority Brands band it with them, and now they're pretty much every single one of 'em are back open and thriving again. Speaker 2 00:25:44 And now, and now I'm, I'm speaking of the cleaning authority. Now, the cleaning authority is number one in their space after Covid. They weren't number one before covid, now they're number one. Yes. Yeah. You see where I'm going with this. And, and I, I think, um, franchising is just getting stronger and stronger. And I think that has a lot to do with more people being more responsible. Um, the FTC I is comes in and is tightening things up to make sure it's more fair for everybody. Yep. Um, and that sometimes can be irritating for us as well. Uh, but I, I absolutely think franchising is here to stay and it's just gonna get better and better and more people are recognizing that. Uh, and you know, think about how many franchisors are out there. It's like over 4,000 Speaker 1 00:26:29 Brands now. I it's not all of, and not all of them are great ones. And again, there's the due diligence, the validation, you wanna be careful. And that's why talking to people within the industry that have experience like yourself and you know, uh, same level of experience for me, but have their ears and eyes glued to the industry can kind of, you know, and not that we would throw anybody under the bus, but there are certain things you wanna stay away from. Uh, you know, a hundred percent agree. I, I tell people that I talk to that, you know, you know, they say, well why a franchise when I can do this myself? I said, look, if you're the type of person that wants to wake up on the morning and either change your front sign or decide to serve soup and make your own soup, then you're right. Speaker 1 00:27:08 Franchising probably isn't for you. Um, but you know, uh, or they say, well, I don't wanna pay royalties. I said, well, you know, in essence, if you owner your own business and independent, you are still paying royalties. No, I'm not said, yes you are. I said, because there's a certain amount of money that has to go back into your business and that is your royalty, that you're paying the business. It's not going into your pocket. It's going into the business. Exactly. So when you pay a royalty or a franchise, or you're paying for them to develop the systems and have them be able to generate income <laugh> Speaker 2 00:27:40 And give you resources, I had that exact conversation last night. You know, why should I, why wouldn't I do this on your own? You could do this on your own. Absolutely. You could do this on, it's not rocket science. But at the end of the day, I can argue you'll spend as much, if not more as an independent than you will with as a franchisee because we've already created the wheel. We already have all the systems in place, and we have these resources and buying power and the technology and all this stuff. You're gonna have to do all that on your own and it's gonna cost you money. So what's more important, your time or your money, how much is your time worth? Right? Right. And, and I have this silly analogy, silly analogy. You're with a franchise, you're investing in a franchise. It's like a short-term marriage with a better exit strategy, <laugh>. And you wanna <laugh>, you wanna, Speaker 1 00:28:29 I gotta use that line. I gotta use that Speaker 2 00:28:31 Line. Right? I, I have a whole analogy that goes along with that. I won't get into all the details, but bottom line is, is you wanna love the people you're mar the family you're marrying. Cuz we're not just marrying our spouses. Let's face it, you're marrying the family and you wanna love the family, Mary. So that goes back to your concept of the due diligence. But yeah, we're on Speaker 1 00:28:49 The same page. Yeah. You know, my father taught that, taught, uh, mentioned same analogy my father taught me many, many moons ago. He says, look, he says, get married. He says, but you know, you're, even if it didn't work out, you're married for life. And I said, what do you mean I'm married for like, well, you know, there's kids or other family, I mean, you're all connected <laugh> Yeah. You're not going anywhere. So Speaker 2 00:29:08 Unless you don't have kids, then you could maybe escape if you don't have to pay alimony. Right. But that is gonna, you're not gonna escape for free, that's for sure. Right? Um, but with franchising, they have a great exit strategy. They can sell their business and, um, Speaker 1 00:29:24 Right. Yeah. People don't realize that that it, it, you know, a lot of people think that a franchise is not an independent business. It is an independent business because if you wanna wake up one morning and sell it or somebody says, I wanna buy it from you, well guess what? As long as the franchise or the brand says okay, and they go through the same process that you went for, it's a win-win for everybody. So Speaker 2 00:29:44 It's exactly Speaker 1 00:29:45 100%. Well, Jamie, I have really enjoyed this conversation. I'd like you to maybe take a minute just to let people know the best way to get in contact with you to learn more about Wolfies. Um, obviously they can reach out to me at this point, but, uh, if you could just point us, point us in the direction, Speaker 2 00:30:03 That'd be great. I think everybody should just reach out to Scotty because he is a rockstar and franchising and has your best. You have your, you have your candidate's best interest at heart and you are so knowledgeable. So I think people should literally just reach out to you to connect with me. But they can't go to own a wolfies.com. Um, Wolfies is W o O F I E s, um, or they can contact me, Jamie Levine. Um, uh, mike email is kind of hard, if you dunno how the French spelling of Levine j Levine, l a v i g e authority brands llc.com, see how long that is, just call Tommy will introduce us. <laugh>. Speaker 1 00:30:43 Well, this has been a great, I I I'm looking forward to having you back on somewhere down the road, you know, sooner rather than later, James. It's always exciting, you know, maybe we'll get into some other topics about entrepreneurship, but, uh, it's been a great, Speaker 2 00:30:56 Yeah, I could be a co-host with Speaker 1 00:30:57 You. Let's do it. Look, we, we've had some fun times in this industry, and that's the beauty of the franchising industry. It's, it's an industry that's supported by everybody. I mean, there, yes, there are a few bad apples, but you know what? Those few bad apples don't spoil the, uh, the tree. Uh, they, they Speaker 2 00:31:12 Take no. And that's in every industry. I have so many big brothers and sisters in this industry, and that's what we just become family. That's great. Speaker 1 00:31:21 Right. Well, everybody, thank you for spending some time with Scotty Myas here, Scott myas franchise coach.com. Uh, what's your know, know your why and all things considered franchising? Uh, you can reach me at Scott Scott myas franchise coach.com or just go to my website, scott myas franchise coach.com and check out my phone number and gimme a call. My number is always open. Well, I shouldn't say always open, but gimme a call. I do still talk on the phone, the phone <laugh>. I still talk on the phone. So this is Scotty Myla saying, uh, so long for now until the next time, and, uh, enjoy your day and have a, uh, and, and, and whatever you decide to do, make sure it's the right decision for you and your family. Speaker 2 00:32:00 Give me.

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